Key note speaker

Saturday, April 26th, 2014

Spalding 155

Dr. Puakea Nogelmeier

Echoes of Captain Cook – Voices Across the Sands (of time and space)

Captain Cook may not have been the first in Hawai’i to require translation, but he was the first to be well-documented. Nearly two and a half centuries later we’re still connected to those early voices that crossed the sands between ship and island shore. The processes have changed, as have the islands’ societies, so the roles of translators have to keep moving along with the times and tides. Translation is caught in, and helps to generate, the ebb and flow of it all.

Keynote speaker flyer 2014

News

Call for Papers

The 18th Annual Graduate Student Conference
 of the College of Languages, Linguistics, and Literature:

“Your Voice, my Voice: Translating and Interpreting Literature, Culture, and Society”

April 26th, 2014

Hosted By:

The College of Languages, Linguistics and Literature,
University of Hawai’i

Abstract Submission Deadline:
 March 14, 2014        

Language shapes cultures, social interactions and human understanding of the world. Given the college’s diverse yet unifying interests, the 18th Graduate Student Conference of the College of Languages, Linguistics, and Literature (LLL) will focus on different aspects of language studies that help us appreciate how languages and literature transmit our rich histories to others, document and perpetuate knowledge in the world, and inform our future. Focusing on the integral role of language as facilitating intercultural communication, this year’s conference will highlight research and projects from graduate students in the College of LLL that explore current issues, methods, technologies and ideologies of language and community, that enable us to effectively communicate and convey meaning across cultural, social, and linguistic boundaries.

Ngugi wa Thiong’o refers to translation as a “common language of languages.” In the spirit of this definition, the conference seeks papers from graduate students that highlight how the translation and interpretation of literature, culture, and society shape who we are, how we interact with the world, and how we engage with the larger community. The conference also seeks to welcome new lines of research utilizing cutting-edge technology or methodology to answer longstanding questions in language studies. We encourage you to interpret the conference theme broadly and flexibly. Areas of particular interest include but are not limited to any of the following:

▪   Interpretation and translation studies

▪   Intercultural studies

▪   Language documentation and conservation

▪   Technology use (e.g. computer-assisted language learning)

▪   Topics in linguistics

▪   Literature, literary studies, new media literacy, comparative literature

▪   Language pedagogy

▪   Language ideologies, policy, and planning

▪   Less commonly taught languages.

▪   Creative writing

▪   Bilingual, immersion, and heritage language education

▪   Language acquisition (e.g. first and additional language, absence of an L1)

▪   Theories in language studies and analyses (e.g. code switching, pragmatics, etc.)

The LLL Graduate Student Conference invites you to present your work in a supportive educational environment. You will receive peer feedback on your presentation,
 and you can submit your paper for publication in the Conference Proceedings!
 The conference will be held at the University of Hawai’i at Manoa on Saturday, April 26, 2014. 

Individual and joint papers are welcome.
 Participants are limited to involvement in no more than two sessions.

Submission Format:
 If you are interested in presenting at the conference, please complete the online submission form. Part of the submission form is a required 250 word abstract. The conference committee will use the abstracts in the presentation selection process.

Acceptance:
 Upon review by conference committee members, you will receive notification of acceptance by e-mail no later than April 5, 2014.

Presentation Format: Paper presentations will be 20 minutes long.
 An additional 5-minute period will be allocated for questions and feedback.

Proposals for poster presentations are also being accepted.

Grace Cassagnol
Marsalee Breakfield
Madoka Nagado
Jing Zhou
Co-chairs of the 18th Annual Graduate Student Conference of the College of LLL

Lucia Aranda, Faculty Advisor
Director, Center for Interpretation and Translation Studies (CITS)

Jim Yoshioka, Events Coordinator
College of Languages, Linguistics, & Literature

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/lllconf

 

Mahalo

Mahalo to everyone for making this year’s conference a fantastic success!

LLL Conf thank you card photo

Dongmin, Keeley, Gordon, and Megumi

17th Annual LLL Grad Conference Co-chairs

 

 

IMPORTANT – Location Change – Final Reminder

Aloha College of LLL Ohana,
This is a reminder of the upcoming LLL Graduate Student Conference “Engaged Research: Language and Community: Linguistics and Communication” THIS SATURDAY (Tomorrow)!
It is also a notice that the Conference on Saturday will hold the opening ceremony, keynote speaker and interdisciplinary brown bag panel in Bilger 152.
See below for more details on the conference:
 =====================================
Time:  8:30 – 2:45, April 20, THIS SATURDAYLocation:  Bilger Hall 152, Webster Hall (multiple rooms)

Links to the program:

http://www.lll.hawaii.edu/lllconference/

Google doc of program

Register here: Registration (not required but appreciated!)

Key features:

- Over 45 students from LLL departments will present their work

- Opening Keynote Address (9:15-10:00 am): Kathryn Davis (SLS) “Engaged Language Research and Practice”

- A moderated open space for creative performances in any language (no pre-registration required)

- An interdisciplinary Brown Bag panel “What’s in store for the upcoming semesters?”(12:05-1:15 pm)

Lucia Aranda (LLEA), Haruko Cook(EALL), Mary Kim (EALL), Luca Onnis (SLS), John Davis (SLS), Amy Schafer (Linguistics) Min Liu (Education), and Christine Malsbary (Education) will provide brief descriptions on the course(s) they plan to teach for Summer and Fall 2013 semesters.

**Cheap cash options for lunch will be available for sale by College of LLL graduate student groups.

We look forward to seeing you there!

Mahalo,

Updated Conference Schedule

8:30-9:00

On-site Registration

Coffee and Breakfast
9:00-9:15
Dean’s Welcome
9:15-10:00
Opening Keynote Address – Dr. Kathryn Davis “Engaged Language Research and Practice”

10:10-12:00

Open Space Presentations – Bilger 152

10:10-10:35
Session One

Webster 101

Webster 102

Webster 112

Webster 113

 

Webster 114

 

Webster 115

 

Webster 116

 

 

David Scrivner: “A Verisimilitude Evaluation”: Language and Everyday Life in George Saunders’s “CivilWarLand in Bad Decline.” Melody Ross: A Preliminary Look at Education and Language Attitudes in East Timor Yoon Hwa Choi: Korean Nominalizers –um and –ki Takafumi Fukushima: Automatic word recognition in L2 reading: A comparison between high and low reading performance groups. Tomoka Wesely: “I’m Korean who live in the U.S.” John Patu: Perpetuating the Fa’asāmoa in Diaspora: Challenges and Possible Solutions to Samoan Language and Culture Maintenance in Hawai’i Nikki Matsumura: Japanese-English Codeswitching in Hawaiʻi: A Generation Y Analysis

10:40-11:05

Session Two

 

Webster 101

Webster 102

Webster 112

Webster 113

 

Webster 114

 

Webster 115

 

Webster 116

 

 

Michael Pak: Silences in Japanese/American Fiction Victoria Chen: The Sino-Tibetan Homeland: A Linguistic-palaeontological Perspective Jing Z. Paul: Expressions of caused motion events: The case of L2 Chinese learners Megumi Jinushi: Linguistic Transfer on English Definite Article and Japanese Medial Demonstrative: Does Transfer Speak for Speaker-Oriented Approach and Hearer Orientation? Aurora Tsai: Patterns of Reading Motivation during L2 Extensive Reading in Japanese Jennifer Holdway: Consciousness-raising through in-service teacher professional development Jason Sung: Vocabulary Acquisitions: Multimedia learning and word writing on Korean L2 Learners

 

11:10-11:35

Session Three

 

Webster 101

Webster 102

Webster 112

Webster 113

 

Webster 114

 

Webster 115

 

Webster 116

 

 

Lisa Shea: Retweet This: Social Rhetorics and the Utility of Amplification Samantha Rarrick: Language Policy and the Revitalization of Native American Languages Maximillion Shakely: Co-construction in Female Conversations in Japanese Claire Stabile: A Preliminary Investigation of Cross-Language Priming Matthew Barbee: Exposed!  A Survey Study of L2 Exposure and Motivation in Japan Jenna Pak: “oh yu it kimchi? okei den.”: Code-switching, Code-mixing, and Identity in Local Korean Discourse Hye Seung Lee: Semantics of Korean com

 

11:40-12:05

Session Four

 

Webster 101

Webster 102

Webster 112

Webster 113

 

Webster 114

 

Webster 115

 

Webster 116

 

 

Kim Compoc: Anxiety and the Queer Cosmopolitan Sean Simpson: Preliminary Results: Phonetic Variation and Perceived Localness in Hawaii Nobou Kubota: Use of gendered languages among preschool male children Ryan Peters and Tomoka Wesely: Participant recruitment using Amazon Mechanical Turk Keeley Cestare: Siren Song: Manifestations of the Sea in 20th Century Spanish Poetry Yuzuko Nagashima: Language, identities, and a sense of belonging Karl Neergaard: Phonotactic Probability and Phonological Neighborhood Density in Bilingual Word Learning

 

12:05-1:15

Lunch – Cash options available in the courtyard for sale by LLL graduate student organizations

 

12:15-1:15

What’s in store for the upcoming semesters? An interdisciplinary brown bag panel featuring Dr. Lucia Aranda (Spanish), Dr. John Davis (SLS), Dr. Christine Malsbary (Institute for Teacher Education), Dr. Amy Shafer (Ling),  Dr. Luca Onnis (SLS), Dr. Mary Kim (Korean), Dr. Haruko Cook (Japanese) and Dr. Min Liu (Ed Psy) 12:15 – 1:15 in Bilger 152

 

1:20 -2:45

Open Space Presentations – Bilger 152

 

1:20 -1:45

Session Five

 

Webster 101

Webster 102

Webster 112

Webster 113

 

Webster 114

 

Webster 115

 

Webster 116

 

 

Aihua Li: Acquisition of the English Aspectal System by Chinese Learners of English Colleen Patton: Considerations for Berber Language Standardization and Official Recognition Sumire Matsuyama: Frequencies of Korean phonemes in the syllable-final position in speech Rubén Fernández Asensio: Language policy in the Kingdom of Hawaiʻi Eve Millett: It Takes a Hurricane: The Renaissance of the French Language in Post-Katrina Louisiana Priscila Leal: “Church helps immigrants learn English”: Engaging in critical moments in language learning Sunhee Kim: Phonological memory and its role in second language vocabulary development

 

1:20 -1:45

Session Six

 

Webster 101

Webster 102

Webster 112

Webster 113

 

Webster 114

 

Webster 115

 

Webster 116

 

 

Edward Hunter Lee: The Hollywood Representation of the Hypermasculinized Asian Male Donna Huynh: The Adoption of Chinese Characters in Japanese and Vietnamese:  A Comparative Analysis of Man’yōgana and Chữ Nôm Hyeyeon Kim: The Acquisition of Korean Numeral Noun Phrases Tantong Champaiboon, Chulalongkorn University: A comparison of words in preschool – grade 3 Thai language textbooks used in 2503 B.E. (1960 A.D.) and 2544 B.E. (2001 A.D.) curricula Maya Iriondo Simek: Presence of pre-christian beliefs in Vacas, a film by Julio Medem Prem Phyak: Language, identity and ethnicity: An intersectionality approach Daniela Culinovic: Tracking development of scopal ambiguities in L1 Japanese interlanguage English

 

2:20 -2:45

Session Seven

 

Webster 101

Webster 102

Webster 112

Webster 113

 

Webster 114

 

Webster 115

 

Webster 116

 

 

Blanca Pruitt: Literary exclusions among Generation 1927 poets: aren’t women citizens too? Shaun Kindred: Unproportional: Disparities of Funding and Endangerment in Languages and Species Susanne DeVore: Humor production in Mandarin and English Conversations Gordon West: Developing an L2 critical reading course: beyond just reading critically 

 

2:45 – 3:15

Pau Hana

Conference Schedule

Announcing the schedule for the 17th Annual College of LLL Graduate Student Conference

“Engaged Research: Language and Community; Linguistics and Communication”

Date: Saturday, April 20th

Location: Spalding and Webster Halls

Schedule

8:30 – Registration Opens

9:00 – Dean’s Welcome (Bilger 152)

9:15 – Keynote Address by Dr. Kathryn Davis, “Engaged Language Research and Practice” (Bilger 152)

10:10 – 12:05 – Concurrent Sessions (Webster Hall)

10:10 – 12:00 – Moderated Open Space (Bilger 152)

12:05 – 1:15 – Lunch

12:15 – 1:15 – Interdisciplinary brown bag panel featuring Dr. Lucia Aranda (Spanish), Dr. John Davis (SLS), Dr. Christine Malsbary (Education), Dr. Amy Shafer (Ling), and Dr. Min Liu (Ed Psy) in Bilger 152

1:20 – 2:45 – Concurrent Sessions (Webster Hall)

1:20 – 2:45 – Moderated Open Space (Bilger 152)

 

Call for participation – Open Space

Aloha College of LLL Ohana,

This year we are proud to announce a new moderated open space that will provide a forum for the presentation of creative works (poetry, short fiction, spoken word, etc.) at the 17th Annual Graduate Student Conference on:
Date: April 20th
Time: 10:10 – 12:00 and 1:20 – 2:45
Location: Bilger 152
Students (grad and undergrad), faculty, and community are welcome to come and share this space. We welcome presentations of any shape or form, limited to five minutes (flexible depending on the moderator’s discretion).
We would also like to stress that presentations are welcome in all languages. Multilingualism is one of the greatest strengths of LLL and we would like to highlight that fact.
We highly encourage your participation! Registration is not required but appreciated
This is a great chance for presentation practice, performance practice, and to get published since all works shared may be submitted for publication in the conference proceedings. Above all, it is a great chance to share your creativity with the community!
Mahalo,

Megumi Jinushi, Dongmin Kim, Keeley Cestare, and Gordon West

 

LLL Graduate Conference Co-chairs

 

What’s New Flyer PDF

 

Keynote Speaker

keynote

Engaged Language Research and Practice

Abstract

Professional associations, higher education institutions, and scholar-activists are increasingly acknowledging the value of engaged research and practice.  University programs such as the Center for Institutional and Social Change at Columbia University promote  a “full participation” diversity and public engagement framework that focuses on enabling people across identities, backgrounds, and institutional positions to realize their capabilities, engage in meaningful institutional life and enable others to do the same (Sturm et al, 2012).  Networks of scholars and communities are also being formed, notably the Urban Research-Based Action Network (URBAN) designed to foster engaged research across university disciplines and within communities.  Building on current trends and the historical legacy of equity scholarship in linguistics and applied linguistics (e.g. Hymes, Hornberger, Labov, Lippi-Green, Rickford, Shohamy, Heller), this presentation explores the potential for engaged research and practice across LLL multilingual/ bilingual and foreign, heritage, indigenous and second language fields.   In seeking “full participation”, the presenter suggests the centrality of engaged dialogic processes towards gaining and raising awareness across communities (institutions and people) of the potential for research, curriculum, pedagogy, and programs that are meaningful and inclusive.

Biography of the Keynote Speaker

Kathryn A. Davis

Kathryn A. Davis’ scholarly interests focus on Language Policy and Planning that draws on engaged ethnography to explore equity and agency across language situations and interdisciplinary fields. Her most recent theoretical work and research involves collaboration with students, colleagues, and communities as represented in the following publications and presentations: “Multicultural Education as Community Engagement: Policies and Planning in a Transnational Era (Davis, Phyak and Bui, 2012); Ethnographic Approaches to Second Language Acquisition in the Encyclopedia of Applied Linguistics (Davis, K., 2012); Language and Literacy Acquisition Theories in the Handbook of Educational Theory (Davis, K., Ovando, C. & Minami, M., 2012). She additionally worked with young scholars in organizing the 2012 Invited Session on Language Policy and Planning from Within: Local Ethnographers Engaging Communities at the American Anthropology Association conference. She is a guest editor for an upcoming thematic issue on Engaged Language Policy and Planning, based on a 2011 AAAL collaboratively organized session on this topic. In Fall 2013 she will be working with colleagues and graduates students in Luxembourg/Europe on research concerning “Language, Identity, and Agency at Transnational Crossroads: Language Planning for Diversity”.

Click here for the flyer for the Kathryn Davis keynote on “Engaged Language Research and Practice”

Call for Volunteers

The 17th Annual

Graduate Student Conference of the

College of Languages, Linguistics, and Literature

“Engaged Research: Language and Society; Linguistics and Communication” 

**VOLUNTEERS NEEDED**

Aloha,

 This is a call for volunteers for the upcoming 17th Annual Graduate Student Conference of the College of Languages, Linguistics, and Literature!

The 17th Annual Graduate Student Conference of the College of Languages, Linguistics, and Literature will be held on Saturday, April 20th, 2013. This conference is organized, staffed and run mainly by students. This year the theme is: “Engaged research: Language and Society; Linguistics and Communication”

Volunteering for the conference is an excellent opportunity to gain organizational & leadership skills, and put on your resume that you were involved in the success of an established conference. We hope that many of you will join us in making this a great year for the annual LLL conference – the more volunteers, the better!

We have a need for a variety of volunteer positions, including volunteers before the conference, during, and after. Attached is an overview of volunteer descriptions, to help you figure out what you would like to work on and gain experience in. When replying, please give us more detail about the positions you are interested in, if any. Here is a brief rundown of the positions we would like to fill – the number in parenthesis is the number of volunteers we would ideally like to have for that position:

Before the conference only:

  • Presenter Coordinator (1)
  • Department Liaison (6, 1 per department)
  • Abstract Readers (18, 3 per department)
  • Publicity Manager (2)
  • Web Designer (1)

Before and during the conference:

  • Opening/Closing Ceremony Coordinator (1)
  • AV Coordinator (1 or 2)
  • Food & Beverage Organizer (2)
  • Registration Organizer (1)

During the conference only:

  • Panel Moderators (8-10)
  • On-site Volunteers (2)
  • Registration Volunteers (4-6)

After the conference:

  • Proceedings Chief Editors (2)
  • Proceedings Assistant Editors (4)

Note: Volunteers who work on the day of the conference will be placed in shifts that allow you to attend the conference as well. You can sign up for as much or as little time as you have available.

If you are interested in any of these positions, please email us (lllconf@hawaii.edu) for more details.

We will be hosting two orientation sessions for volunteers, which we request those interested in volunteering to attend. Here are the offered sessions:

Friday, February 22nd: 1:30-2:30 in Moore 107

Monday, February 25th: 1:30-2:30 in Moore 107.

Even if you are unsure of whether or not you would like to volunteer, please come to a session anyway! We can answer your questions and help you figure out whether or not volunteering is a good fit for you.

If you cannot make either of these sessions, please reply to this email, and we will arrange a time to meet with you and go over any information you might need or want.

We encourage students from all departments to volunteer, as we would like the input and involvement from the entirety of the College of LLL. The direction and formulation of the conference, especially the programs presented, will run the risk of not adequately representing the work of all graduate students from all departments, should we lack liaisons from any one department. As we would like to present this conference as the creation of the College of LLL as a whole, we highly encourage everyone to volunteer!

In the end, “we don’t want your money, we want your helping hands … :) “! Thank you very much for helping us in developing an amazing conference this year. We look forward to hearing from you!

Mahalo,

Call for Papers

Call for Papers

The 17th Annual Graduate Student Conference
of the College of Languages, Linguistics, and Literature

 “Engaged Research: Language and Society; Linguistics and Communication”

April 20th, 2013

Hosted by:
The College of Languages, Linguistics and Literature,
University of Hawai’i

Abstract Submission Deadline:
March 15, 2013

Doing research, especially in language, linguistics, and literature, is an act that requires engagement with the larger community at many different levels. The 17th College of Languages, Linguistics, and Literature (LLL) Graduate Student Conference theme is designed to help us critically reflect on the nature of our engagement with community and society as researchers from an academic setting. Given the diverse sets of interests represented by the many academic departments in the College of LLL, how are we unified by a set of common guiding principles regarding community and societal goals? What is the goal of our research in broad terms? This year’s conference will highlight research and projects from graduate students that explore and engage with an array of issues, ideologies, methods, languages, and communities.

The conference seeks papers from graduate students that highlight how language shapes who we are, how we interact with the world, and how language engages with community. The conference also seeks to welcome new lines of research utilizing cutting-edge technology or methodology to answer longstanding questions in language studies. Areas of particular interest include but are not limited to any of the following:

  • Language documentation and conservation
  • Technology use (e.g. computer-assisted language learning)
  • Literature, literary studies, new media literacy
  • Language pedagogy
  • Language ideologies, policy, and planning
  • Less commonly taught languages (e.g. Maori, Hindi, Ilokano, etc.)
  • Creative writing
  • Bilingual, immersion, and heritage language education
  • First and additional language (i.e. second and third) acquisition and their use in children, adolescents, adults, and bilinguals, etc.
  • Theories in language studies and analyses

The LLL Graduate Student Conference invites you to present your work in a supportive educational environment. You will receive peer feedback on your presentation,
and you can submit your paper for publication in the Conference Proceedings!
 The conference will be held at the University of Hawai’i at Manoa on Saturday, April 20th, 2013.  Individual and joint papers, as well as poster presentations are welcome.
 Participants are limited to involvement in no more than two sessions.

Submission Format:
If you are interested in presenting at the conference, please complete the online submission form. Part of the submission form is the required 250 word abstract. The conference committee will use the abstracts in the presentation selection process.

Acceptance:
Upon review by conference committee members, you will receive notification of acceptance by e-mail no later than April 2, 2013.

Presentation Format:

Paper presentations will be 20 minutes long.
 An additional 5-minute period will be allocated for questions and feedback.

Proposals for poster presentations are also being accepted.