Mānoa Institutional Learning Objectives for Undergraduate Students

In May, 2012, the Mānoa Faculty Senate approved the institutional learning objectives (ILO) for undergraduate students at Mānoa.  The approved ILOs consist of sets of Knowledge, Skills, and Values (see the box below) for our undergraduate students to achieve as a result of their overall experiences at Mānoa, including as part of academic programs, the Gen Ed and Arts & Sciences requirements, as well as co-curricular activities.  No single program or course is expected to meet all of the ILOs. However, it’s important that our undergraduate program-level and course-level student learning outcomes (SLOs) contribute to the ILOs so that we collectively inspire our students to achieve our common educational objectives as well as their individual goals.

The student learning outcomes (SLOs) for individual BA programs provided by LLL address the core Intellectual and Practical Skills (see curriculum maps for LLL degree programs, which include program-specific SLOs).  Not all of our BA programs make an explicit link between their SLOs and the institutional core Values but, again, they are not meant to be fully addressed by any single program. Students may achieve and appreciate these competencies and values through their collective educational experiences at Mānoa.

For  future requests for substantial undergraduate curricular changes (e.g., new courses/programs, changes in degree/certificate requirements, etc.), you will need  to address how the proposed changes would contribute not only to the program SLOs, but to the ILOs as well.

Please note that these core Intellectual and Practical Skills and Values are also emphasized in the WASC standards as well as in essential learning outcomes identified as part of the AACU’s Liberal Education and America’s Promise (LEAP) initiative. If you click on an ILO in the box that you plan to assess for your program (or class), you will find a table that provides AACU’s definitions and sample scoring rubrics for specific abilities to be assessed. You may find these materials useful in designing your own assessment rubrics (e.g., for capstone/research papers, presentations, projects, etc.). For example, if you plan to assess “written communication” skills demonstrated by capstone or final papers or written exams, click on “Communicate and report.”  You will find a definition and a rubric for assessing “written communication.” 

Mānoa Institutional Learning Objectives for Undergraduate Students

Breadth and Depth of Knowledge

Students develop their understanding of the world with emphasis on Hawaii, Asia, and the Pacific (by integrating general education, specialized study in the major, and course work and co-curricular experiences related to Hawaiian culture and history)

Intellectual and Practical Skills

Students improve their abilities to

Essential Values

Students demonstrate excellence, integrity, and engagement through


You may find additional rubrics through the following links:

Table 1. Students improve their abilities to think critically and creatively (Ability ILO)

Abilities to be accessed AACU’s Definition Rubric (pdf version) Rubric (word version)
Critical thinking Critical thinking is a habit of mind characterized by the comprehensive exploration of issues, ideas, artifacts, and events before accepting or formulating an opinion or conclusion. CriticalThinking.pdf CriticalThinking.doc
Creative thinking Creative thinking is both the capacity to combine or synthesize existing ideas, images, or expertise in original ways and the experience of thinking, reacting, and working in an imaginative way characterized by a high degree of innovation, divergent thinking, and risk taking. CreativeThinking.pdf CreativeThinking.doc
Problem solving Problem solving is the process of designing, evaluating and implementing a strategy to answer an open-ended question or achieve a desired goal. ProblemSolving.pdf ProblemSolving.doc
Information literacy The ability to know when there is a need for information, to be able to identify, locate, evaluate, and effectively and responsibly use and share that information for the problem at hand. InformationLiteracy.pdf InformationLiteracy.doc
Reading Reading is the process of simultaneously extracting and constructing meaning through interaction and involvement with written language. Reading.pdf Reading.doc

Reprinted [or Excerpted] with permission from Assessing Outcomes and Improving Achievement: Tips and tools for Using Rubrics, edited by Terrel L. Rhodes. Copyright 2010 by the Association of American Colleges and Universities.”  For acceptable use and reprint permission, see: http://www.aacu.org/value/rubrics/reprint.cfm

Table 2. Students improve their abilities to conduct research (Ability ILO)

Abilities to be accessed AACU’s Definition Rubric (pdf version) Rubric (word version)
Inquiry and analysis Inquiry is a systematic process of exploring issues, objects or works through the collection and analysis of evidence that results in informed conclusions or judgments. Analysis is the process of breaking complex topics or issues into parts to gain a better understanding of them. InquiryAnalysis.pdf InquiryandAnalysis.doc
Quantitative literacy Quantitative Literacy (QL) is a “habit of mind,” competency, and comfort in working with numerical data. Individuals with strong QL skills possess the ability to reason and solve quantitative problems from a wide array of authentic contexts and everyday life situations. QuantitativeLiteracy.pdf QuantitativeLiteracy.doc

Excerpted with permission from Assessing Outcomes and Improving Achievement: Tips and tools for Using Rubrics, edited by Terrel L. Rhodes. Copyright 2010 by the Association of American Colleges and Universities.”  For acceptable use and reprint permission, see: http://www.aacu.org/value/rubrics/reprint.cfm

Table 3. Students improve their abilities to communicate and report (Ability ILO)

Abilities to be accessed AACU’s Definition Rubric (pdf version) Rubric (word version)
Oral communication Oral communication is a prepared, purposeful presentation designed to increase knowledge, to foster understanding, or to promote change in the listeners’ attitudes, values, beliefs, or behaviors. OralCommunication.pdf OralCommunication.doc
Written communication Written communication is the development and expression of ideas in writing. Written communication involves learning to work in many genres and styles. It can involve working with many different writing technologies, and mixing texts, data, and images. WrittenCommunication.pdf WrittenCommunication.doc

Excerpted with permission from Assessing Outcomes and Improving Achievement: Tips and tools for Using Rubrics, edited by Terrel L. Rhodes. Copyright 2010 by the Association of American Colleges and Universities.”  For acceptable use and reprint permission, see: http://www.aacu.org/value/rubrics/reprint.cfm

Table 4. Students demonstrate excellence, integrity, and engagement through continuous learning and personal growth (Value ILO)

Ethical reasoning Ethical Reasoning is reasoning about right and wrong human conduct.  It requires students to be able to assess their own ethical values and the social context of problems, recognize ethical issues in a variety of settings, think about how different ethical perspectives might be applied to ethical dilemmas and consider the ramifications of alternative actions. EthicalReasoning.pdf EthicalReasoning.doc
Integrative learning Integrative learning is an understanding and a disposition that a student builds across the curriculum and co-curriculum, from making simple connections among ideas and experiences to synthesizing and transferring learning to new, complex situations within and beyond the campus. IntegrativeLearning.pdf IntegrativeLearning.doc
Foundations and skills for lifelong learning Lifelong learning is all purposeful learning activity, undertaken on an ongoing basis with the aim of improving knowledge, skills and competence. LifelongLearning.pdf LifelongLearning.doc

Excerpted with permission from Assessing Outcomes and Improving Achievement: Tips and tools for Using Rubrics, edited by Terrel L. Rhodes. Copyright 2010 by the Association of American Colleges and Universities.”  For acceptable use and reprint permission, see: http://www.aacu.org/value/rubrics/reprint.cfm

Table 5. Students demonstrate excellence, integrity, and engagement through respect for people and cultures, in particular Hawaiian culture (Value ILO)

Intercultural knowledge Intercultural Knowledge and Competence is “a set of cognitive, affective, and behavioral skills and characteristics that support effective and appropriate interaction in a variety of cultural contexts.” InterculturalKnowledge.pdf InterculturalKnowledge.doc

Excerpted with permission from Assessing Outcomes and Improving Achievement: Tips and tools for Using Rubrics, edited by Terrel L. Rhodes. Copyright 2010 by the Association of American Colleges and Universities.”  See acceptable use and reprint permission: http://www.aacu.org/value/rubrics/reprint.cfm

Table 6.  Students demonstrate excellence, integrity, and engagement through continuous learning and personal growth civic participation in their communities (Value ILO)

Civic engagment Civic engagement is “working to make a difference in the civic life of our communities and developing the combination of knowledge, skills, values and motivation to make that difference. It means promoting the quality of life in a community, through both political and non-political processes.” CivicEngagement.pdf CivicEngagement.doc
Teamwork Teamwork is behaviors under the control of individual team members (effort they put into team tasks, their manner of interacting with others on team, and the quantity and quality of contributions they make to team discussions.) Teamwork.pdf Teamwork.doc

Excerpted with permission from Assessing Outcomes and Improving Achievement: Tips and tools for Using Rubrics, edited by Terrel L. Rhodes. Copyright 2010 by the Association of American Colleges and Universities.”  For acceptable use and reprint permission, see: http://www.aacu.org/value/rubrics/reprint.cfm